Shit for sale… soon.

I'd prefer local buyers so I don't have to ship any of it. More importantly, I offer more than a few options for payment, be it Square, Square Cash, PayPal, Circle Pay, Zelle, or Chase Quick Pay. I'm able to accommodate all of these options because I'm legit. For gear, I have a couple of camera bags, 2 or 3 Benro tripods, a Slik tripod, Benro monopods, a few ball heads in various sizes, some tripod bags, a Formatt-Hitech Firecrest 100mm Filter Holder System with extra polarizer, adapters and original packaging, a Formatt-Hitech Standard 100mm Filter Holder, and random 100mm ND filters. There's probably even more in my storage closet I've forgotten about. If you're interested, leave a comment or email me directly.

What’s So Great About Gitzo, Anyways? (Part 2)

So, I tore down my Gitzo Mountaineer GT1542 to see what's so special about it. Actually, I do this with every tripod I buy to discover its weaknesses and proper disassembly for maintenance, cleaning, and lubrication. During the process I just happen to take a close look at each part to see how well it's been made, purely out of curiosity. In this case, I was truly interested to see if Manfrotto/Gitzo does anything differently during the manufacturing process that justifies the higher retail price or legendary status.

Wine Country Camera Filters: Screw-On versus 100mm

Very simply: Does Wine Country Camera actually use the same glass and coatings between their filters? I wanted my filters to produce the same results between my filter sets to reduce post-processing time. Recently, I replaced my B+W and Haida ND filters with WCC because the results between the two would cause difficulties in post as I'd work to match the output if I used both during the same shoot.

What’s So Great About Gitzo, Anyways? (Part 1)

Serious question: What’s so great about Gitzo tripods? After spending a few hours inspecting my new Gitzo GT1542 Mountaineer Series 1 tripod and GH1382QD Series 1 ball head, for every positive engineering or design decision they made, there’s an equally puzzling or outright poor one. For now, I’m going to focus solely on the knobs for the ball head. I promise I’ll focus on the other things later once I’ve gotten a better look, but the next item will be the leg angle locks.

So, Why All the New Filters?

What may just look like wasting money, there’s an actual reason why I’ve bought into the Wine Country Camera filter holder system and round filters to replace the kits I had before:

I’m planning to purchase a Fujifilm GFX-50S by year’s end.

The Wine Country Camera Filter Holder System is… Huge.

This is one aspect of the Wine Country Camera system I was not expecting at all. While most systems fit up to 82mm lens threads, the Wine Country Camera holder is able to fit lens threads up to 95mm due to its much larger size. It still takes 100mm filters, but combined with the filter Locker system that engages the rails to provide up to a 15mm larger diameter lens aperture, the adapter system and holder also places the filters closer to the front element for a shorter overall profile. The result is the ability to fit on both larger and wider angle lenses than other filter holders.

I’ve Learned the Secret to Using ND Filters: Consistency.

Since finding joy in landscape photography, I made the decision to try and do as much "in camera" as possible in an attempt to teach myself the art of photography, rather than exploit the science of photography, to create a photograph. As such, I slowly learned exactly what that meant and have been on the quest to acquire the best tools for me to do so, starting with a solid tripod and high quality circular polarizers.

From there, I continued. I bought a set of B+W ND filters in 3-, 6-, and 10-stops. Then, I bought a Formatt-Hitech (F-H) 100mm Firecrest filter holder kit so I could use graduated ND filters, solid ND filters, and a circular polarizer all at once.

Canon’s Latest Sales Figures Are Way Down But Why Are You So Confused?

Canon is trying to sell us cameras from 2016 at 2019 prices, all up and down their lineup. Their biggest advances have been made in their entry level cameras, a market mostly ignored by both first time buyers and enthusiasts. As ILC cameras have become a luxury in the age of smartphones, the impact of entry level models will continue to shrink moving forward. The future is in models that appeal to enthusiasts while Canon has dumbed down their lineup instead. They’re still banking on entry level, mass market, low cost, high volume models while the consumer has been filtered down to primarily enthusiasts. The mass market has lost their desire or need for the ILC.

WordPress.com.

Up ↑